"Like other indigenous languages, the Haida language - and therefore these songs - contain insights into a different way to living with the land, with each other, and with one's own being. Like other spiritual music, it is my hope that this music will help to facilitate positive growth."

 

 
 

Terri-Lynn's album "New Journeys" is a first for Haida music. Featuring songs in the Haida language and accompanied by guitar, piano, cello and percussion, this album creates a fusion of cultures, introducing many people to the grace, depth and beauty of Haida musical traditions.

Stunning. Warm and seductive - highly recommended.
— John Mann

 

"I find Haida songs very beautiful, and hope that instrumentation will help others experience their beauty and connect to the music in a way that may not be possible with Haida music in a more traditional format."

 

Inspiration for the Album

"I felt it was important for this “New Journey” to begin with a solid foundation in traditional Haida music — rather than beginning with a western or pop music base and adding Haida words or vocables.

While the songs on the album are mostly contemporary songs, they are in a traditional format. For instance, some of the songs contain only three notes (which is true for many ancient Haida songs) and yet they hold your attention. They sit beautifully with the arrangements. I felt it was important for the songs to remain in the Haida language. There are so few fluent Haida speakers remaining that the language is endangered. Like other indigenous languages, the Haida language and therefore these songs, contain insights into a different way to living with the land, with each other, and with one’s own being. Like other spiritual music, it is my hope that this music will help to facilitate positive growth."

Beautiful. Fresh and lovely. Sweetly exotic.
— Bruce Cockburn

 

"I recognize that the majority of today’s society doesn’t yet recognize the beauty and pureness of First Nations’ music traditions, or its ability to touch the core of your heart in a very unique way and open doors to whole new realms. T. Bone Burnett once told me, after he heard a Haida song, that he felt that the truth could be found in native songs, or folk songs.

"Creating an album that bridges two cultures and helps people of different backgrounds to connect with each other reflects the current need in Canadian society to reach reconciliation with Aboriginal Peoples. This step is part of a larger movement to work together respectfully and reach long-lasting reconciliation of Canada’s history with Aboriginal Peoples. Great trust is required for this to occur, on all sides!"

Primal. Soulful. Brings the past to the present.
— Tom Jackson

Album musicians - left to right: Terri-Lynn Williams-Davidson, Robert Davidson (hand drum), Simon Kendall (keyboards), Bruce Ruddell (producer and arrangements), Sue Round (cello), Dave Corman (guitar), Jason Ovary (percussion).

2011-2013 ‘NEW JOURNEYS’ AWARD NOMINATIONS & performances

2011 Winner | ‘Best Female Artist’ Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards

2009 Winner | Best Female Traditional, Cultural Roots Award | 2009 Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards

2008 Winner | Keeper of Traditions Special Honour Award | 2008 Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards

2011 Nominated | Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Awards | ‘Best Folk /Acoustic CD’, ‘Single of the Year’

2011 Nominated | Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards | ‘Best Female Artist’, ‘Best Folk/ Acoustic’ Album, and ‘Best Songwriter’

2011 Nominated | Canadian Folk Music Awards | ‘Aboriginal Songwriter of the Year’, and ‘World Solo Artist of the Year’ (The first Canadian Aboriginal artist in the CFMA’s history to receive a nomination in this category).

2012 Nominated | Western Canadian Music Awards | ‘World Recording of the Year’

2012 Nominated | Native American Music Awards | ‘Best Female Vocalist/Best Female Artist’, ‘Historical/Linguistic’ Recording

2011 Performer at the Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards ceremony, Toronto, Ontario

2011 Cited as one of the top 10 most Influential Indigenous Albums of 2011 by RPM Indigenous Music Culture